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    Temp Tat News — tattoo

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    We've Gone International!

    We've Gone International!

    "And, if you are going to Outside Lands, Bonnaroo, Coahella, etc.

    --for the first or tenth time--you will impress the other revelers

    with your deviant, dark jagua tattoos."

    "So, if you are contemplating getting a real tattoo, Earth Henna's

    Black Jagua Temporary Tattoo Kit might be 

    the safest way to test out some designs before committing."

    From SOMA Magazine's Spring Fashion Issue    

    Just have to share! Earth Henna is featured in the April/May issue of SOMA Magazine, and we couldn't be prouder. Thank you to Leah Tassinari and all the great people at SOMA for including us in the coolest new wave magazine in the world! Here is a reprint of the entire article. Let SOMA know you like it by clicking here. Thank you!

     

     Hailed internationally as the seminal voice and vision of independent, avant-garde arts, fashion, culture and design for 27 years, SOMA Magazine has cultivated immense organic appeal and forged its place within the thriving creative industries and communities the world over.  

     

    Prepare yourself for an onslaught of “woke” Instagram posts and hippie-chic clothing lines flooding your Facebook feed; Festival season is upon us! As influencers and techies alike swarm the once desolate fields, swaying to the latest EDM mashups, clothing becomes scarce and glitter and flower crowns become apropos; mild appropriation occurs as fashionistas naively don cornrows or feathers purchased at the nearest fast-fashion retailer; and every sad sob stuck in an office rolls his or her eyes, feigning indifference at what, admittedly, looks like a damn good time. Henna, traditionally used for social occasions in select Eastern cultures (most recognizably in Indian weddings), has also recently become a trend in the fashion and festival worlds, with floral scrolls and linear abstractions climbing up the wrists of many a festival frolicker. Earth Henna, a family owned business, foresaw this trend when they started their business back in 1997 and branched out to offer creative kits as well as unique dye colors to stand out from the rest of the temporarily-tattooed crowd.

    Husband and wife duo, Pascal Giacomo and Carine Fabius, opened the first henna tattoo studio in the United States. It was through this direct work with pleased customers that the idea to package and sell henna kits was born. The pair earned media accolades for their work, and Fabius even published a book on the art form. Nowadays, henna artists can be hired for weddings and kits can be bought online or at certain retailers, so frankly, what sets Earth Henna apart is not obvious at first. However, the brand has a unique story and a commitment to keeping the product natural that distinguish it from others.

    Reading the Earth Henna story is almost like delving into The Alchemist — if you close your eyes, you can almost picture Giacomini wandering like a shepherd through the deserts of Morocco. In the Sahara Desert, Giacomini learned about the henna harvesting process, where a family of henna farmers showed him the mill where dried leaves were turned into powder for application. After finding the source for the tattoos, Giacomini and Fabius then proceeded to improve the shelf life while still keeping the product natural. After a plethora of tests and trial runs, their flagship product was born.

    After the success and popularity of the traditional “red” henna kits, customers began to inquire about black henna that mimics real tattoos, and so began the second international research journey. This trip brought Giacomini to the Peruvian Amazon where he met the very primal tribe of Matsés Indians in the jungle. After begrudgingly welcoming him into their community, they showed him the jagua fruit and the processes used to create all natural, non-harmful jagua tattoos, i.e. temporary, all-natural, black tattoos.

    So, if you are contemplating getting a real tattoo, Earth Henna’s Black Jagua Temporary Tattoo Kit might be the safest way to test out some designs before committing. The kits also come with stencils if you don’t know what design you want, or if you just recently had five espresso shots. And, if you are going to Outside Lands, Bonnaroo, Coachella, etc. — for the first or tenth time — you will impress the other revelers with your deviant, dark jagua tattoos.

    Text by Leah Tassinari

    jagua tattoo

    Photo courtesy of Violetta Villacorta

    Visit us at www.earthhenna.com!

    5 Things I Love About Henna

    5 Things I Love About Henna

    1. I’m a writer, so I love words. I can write a word I love on my body with henna, and there it will stay for 7-10 days. Like ineffable, which means incapable of being described with words, like life! 
    1. I’m also an author, an art dealer and a freelance museum curator. Creating henna tattoo kits is my day job. I’m so happy that, like my other cherished pursuits, henna body art falls into the creative arts group. 
    1. Curating museum exhibitions and writing books requires research into the history of the subject matter at hand, which I love. Investigating the 5,000-year-old henna body artform brought me such magical knowledge about henna cultures throughout India, Africa and the Middle East! I am richer for it. And speaking of 5,000 years, it occurred to me that I’ve been saying henna is a 5000-year-old artform for about 20 years now. So it’s official, henna is a 5020-year-old artform! 
    1. While we’re on the subject of magic, in case you didn’t know, in all the different countries where henna grows, people believe the plant is infused with magical properties, and that whoever is painted with henna will be gifted with love, luck and prosperity. 
    1. I have witnessed people waiting in line for as long as 4 hours to get a henna tattoo (like at Vidcon last year). No matter how cranky they are by the time their turn comes, they always leave with a smile. Henna makes people happy!

    What's The Jagua Story? - Part II

    What's The Jagua Story? - Part II

    Last week I posted about how we got started in the jagua tattoo business, and about our introduction to the Matsés people, who live in the heart of the Peruvian Amazon jungle and harvest the jagua fruit we use in our Earth Jagua kits. I gave the condensed version, and promised more details for those who might want to know more.

    So let me start by filling in some holes on exactly what it takes to get to the Amazon. The flight from Los Angeles to Lima, Peru is 8 ½ hours with a four-hour layover (in the middle of the night) in the Lima airport before the next flight out to Iquitos. Pascal was met in Iquitos by the American facilitator, whom I referred to as Mr. X in my book, Jagua—A Journey into Body Art from the Amazon. I shall continue to call him Mr. X because, well, if you can’t say anything nice… He did provide the all-important introduction and vital information needed for the formalities involved in doing business with indigenous peoples, and for that we are very grateful; but suffice it to say that he was very challenging to deal with, engaged in some unsavory practices and for several years now, for good reasons, the Matsés no longer have anything to do with him.

    The most important advice Mr. X conveyed to Pascal was The List. Upon first meeting with any indigenous group, you must come bearing gifts, otherwise you are considered extremely rude, especially if they view you as an “important visitor.” The list was long. He suggested that Pascal arrive with much-needed antibiotics, anti-bronchitis, anti-flu and stomach flu medicines, as well as anti-malaria pills, aspirin and more medial supplies. In addition, he needed to show up with some basics, like machetes, files, fishhooks and fishing lines, as well as t-shirts for the kids, pots and pans and jewelry beads for the women, hammocks, netting, rubber boots and other gear considered valuable to the community. Pascal’s time in Iquitos was mostly spent running around in mototaxis, going from one pharmacy to another and to the Belen open-air market, which is packed with pickpockets and back-to-back stalls selling a mind-bending variety of wares, including food and second-rate merchandise from China.

    After three days in Iquitos, Pascal’s next destination was a military outpost and launching pad for the motorized canoe, which would take him into the Matsés village in question (he thought he was going there by boat, but it turned out to be a dugout canoe). When he arrived at the airport, even though he had reservations, he was told the flight was booked solid. He had two options: 1) Wait one week for the next scheduled flight, or 2) charter a plane himself, which means shelling out the money for 12 seats. Reluctantly, he went for option #2.

    Pascal and Mr. X boarded the flight, and after two hours of nothing but green, impenetrable jungle, a clearing appeared and they landed on a tiny, deserted airstrip. Next up was a half-mile-long hike (with all the gear) to reach the military outpost, whose one hotel was filthy. The only furniture in Pascal’s room was a foul-smelling mattress with no sheets! But his first meeting with Daniel, Chief of the Matsés, went very well. They hung out and talked for a couple of hours, but it was getting dark and there was more shopping to do, this time for foodstuff like sardines, eggs, bread, cooking oil and rice, along with water and gasoline. If you’re planning to do business in the Amazon, don’t forget your wallet!

    Tune in next week for the next and final leg of the journey!

    In the meantime, do check out our brand new website (we’re so jazzed!), where you can find Grrrrreat deals on our Earth Jagua black temporary tattoo kit for the holidays. And while you're visiting our site, do sign up for our newsletter so you can receive notifications of these weekly blog postings, and special stuff like our upcoming Holiday Specials!

    Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!

    What’s The Jagua Story?

    What’s The Jagua Story?

    People so often ask how we came to be involved with jagua and the Amazon that I thought I’d write it down and point people to our blog! To my husband Pascal and me, we were just doing what we always do—walk through a promising door when it opens. But people keep telling us how unusual the story is, so here goes. I’ll give you the condensed version.

    We were minding our business selling our Earth Henna tattoo kits when we heard about the jagua fruit. Always on the lookout for a natural stain that would look like a real tattoo, I Googled to see what I could find. I happened onto an article written by an American ecologist and conservationist living in the Peruvian Amazon. In it he had posted pictures of himself hanging out with members of the Matsés people covered in what looked like tribal tattoos, but the caption mentioned that the body art was made with jagua.

    I emailed the author of the article and explained that for 12 years our company had been buying the entire harvest of one family of henna farmers in Morocco. I said we would love to establish a relationship with the Matsés people as our source for the jagua fruit. He was eager to help the Matsés establish economic viability, and readily facilitated the introduction. No trees are cut down to create our product. If not for us, the jagua fruit—which grows in profusion there—would just fall to the ground and rot. Win-win!

    Not long after, Pascal found himself on a plane headed for Lima, Peru. From there he took another plane to bustling Iquitos, the gateway city to the jungle; a tiny military transport plane then flew him to another village; from there an 8-hour, hot, humid and mosquito-filled canoe ride deposited him in the village where 200 Matsés people live. Daniel, the 38-year-old chief of the group, spent the next three weeks showing Pascal how they harvest the jagua fruit and turn it into the juice we use as the base of our Earth Jagua gel. He and Pascal established a system for how they would ship the juice to us, as well as a communication protocol since there are no phones or internet available in the Amazon jungle!

    The jagua tattoo business isn’t always easy, and is quite often tricky—luckily Pascal and Daniel both speak Spanish (the older, and uneducated Matsés only speak Matsés!). Still, nuance sometimes gets lost and misunderstandings occur; shipments can get delayed by the famously capricious Peruvian customs agency. This is a major concern since the juice must be as fresh as possible when it arrives to us in Los Angeles (this is why we use citric acid, a natural preservative, to keep it that way while in transit). Once here, we have each batch tested for bacteria and parasites, then we send it to a facility, which freeze-dries the juice so that our Earth Jagua kits can have a shelf life while they wait to be scooped up by customers in retail stores and online.

    The trouble is worth it, though, because people lovelovelove their jagua tattoos! It’s a sustainable product, which helps support a very economically challenged people. We help pay for the group’s malaria medicine each year, and help them out with other issues, when necessary, and they provide us with the means to make people happy, pay our bills and keep our staff employed. All good stuff.  I’ll expand on the story in my next blog!

    If you’d like to try out an Earth Jagua Black Temporary Tatttoo Kit, do it now! You can get 15% off and Free Shipping on all henna and jagua kits, just in time for the holidays.

    And to find out about exciting upcoming specials, go to www.earthhenna.com (scroll down to the bottom of the page) to sign up and receive our newsletter!

    Olympian Tattoos


    Natashia KaiHas anyone noticed the number of Olympic athletes with tattoos on their Olympian bodies? Kinda hard not to. It’s almost like if you don’t have a tattoo that’s why you’re not winning! Someone needs to study the incidence of athletes with and without tattoos, and the relationship to medals won. Totally based on my unscientific intuition, I bet you those with tattoos win more.

    …And then again, there’s Usain Bolt, who has none! OK, maybe one has nothing to do with the other, but think about it, people with tattoos have conviction, are fearless and know what they want. I don’t have any tattoos myself—hey, I’m in the temporary tattoo business, right?—so I say this, not from any visceral experience, but I figure you have to own those qualities if you permanently mark your body with an image, symbol, phrase or word. Who knows if you’ll later wish you hadn’t done it. That’s not the point. The point is you had enough guts to do it.

    So many people have tattoos now that some consider it frivolous or merely a fashion statement, or a trend. But I don’t believe the trend theory for a minute. For one thing it’s been going on for way too long with no sign of abatement. Whatever the reasons for imprinting indelible messages on your body, they’re real to you, and that’s all that matters.

    Whether someone thinks your tattoos are beautiful, ugly, works of art or a stupid mess, that’s their problem, isn’t it? It’s your tattoo. You own it. It’s yours, and no one can take it away from you, unless you choose to divest yourself of it through laser removal, which no one thinks is the most fun or successful experience in the world.

    People who get inked are making a statement about who they are—whatever that may be. And in the case of athletes, I’m willing to bet the statement has something to do with I can win this thing. I’ve got what it takes.

    Time to put some skin in the game, y’all! So maybe you start with a temporary tattoo and see how you like it. That’s one way to get started on the road to expressing yourself. And then see where that expression takes you.

    Image: American soccer star Natasha Kai, Zimbio.com; Photo credit: Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images North America